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The Sustainable Smallholding is the blog and internet name for the Wolds Woodland Farming Project. A 4 acre Smallholding in Lincolnshire, a Permaculture Association LAND Demonstration project, designed and run using Permaculture Principles.

Permaculture Smallholding

Apologies Due

Hi

To those of you who have kept looking for updates on the blog I’m sorry that I’ve not posted any new content for months. I’m currently on a full time college course, preparing to go to University this September (2015). So I’ve been focussed on getting my college work and assignments done, rather than keeping up with the blog.

The good news is that I’ve finished all of my written assignments now (late April), and only have one test to sit in May, so can get some updates written and posted.

For those of you who use Facebook, I do put up stuff on my facebook page. It’s not meant to have the same depth to it, but does allow me to put little bits of information and ‘stuff’ out on a regular basis.

I will deal with the 16 comments sat waiting for me to deal with over the next week or two.

The Sustainable Smallholding Blog

The Blog Page contains over two hundred posts, covering most aspects of smallholding. The posts include vegetable growing, small scale grain growing, chickens, bees, bee plants, hardy bamboo, and of course Permaculture. The best way to access posts on subjects that you are interested in is to use the drop down ‘Category’ menu on the right side of the page.

Permaculture Designs

I was recently awarded the Diploma in Applied Permaculture Design, and my portfolio designs are all listed under the Permaculture Diploma Tab at the top of the page. They include the overall design for The Wolds Woodland Farming Project, my own Permaculture Design Process, my own Permaculture Design Method, my Chicken Scavenging System, and a one acre Forest Garden.

Range of Interests and Posts

I am experimenting with my own Vegetable/Grain Polyculture, trying to devise a method for growing all of our food from the smallest space possible, without importing fertility in from outside of the project. There are posts about Small Scale Grain Growing, composting, and compost tea that relate to this. My focus now is on research, especially Chicken Scavenging Systems, and Sustainable Grain Growing. Both of which will feature more in the coming months. I use Permaculture to design, and combine what I do to make it more efficient. One of the principles of permaculture is that every element should perform more than one function. By carefully combining, and building the designs using permaculture principles, I get more useful functions from everything that I design and do.

There is a Sustainable Smallholding Facebook Page, and I have had articles published in Permaculture Magazine, and in Permaculture Works, which is the magazine of the Permaculture Association.

I welcome comments on the blog posts, and answer all of them. There is an option to subscribe to the blog by email, and I would encourage you to do that. I post less frequently than I used to, so getting an email alert is a good way to stop you having to keep checking for new content.

Finally there is the option to visit us. We are one of three Permaculture Association LAND projects based in Lincolnshire. Why not come and look around a part of Permaculture Lincolnshire?

Deano

26 thoughts on “HOME

  1. Hilary

    Hello Deano – I’ve not had a chance to look at all of your blogs yet, but like what you are doing and congrats on getting your Diploma. We are specialist Eucalyptus growers and currently looking closer at SRF. I am just wondering how you got on with your Eucalyptus trees and which species you chose to plant. When you have a spare moment (whatever one of those is!) I would be really pleased if you could drop me a line ( or give me a call on 0751 5261511) and let me know how they are doing.

    Reply
    1. Deano Martin Post author

      Hi Hilary
      I’ve grown Perrinianna, Nitens, Coccifera, and Cider gum. The Spinning gum has dome well except in the low lying areas (frost pocket or wet?), and the Cider Gum has been bullet proof everywhere. I lost the labels out of the other two, so am not entirely sure which are which but I have examples of both doing OK. All are too juvenile to start coppiceing yet but are growing quickly. Could let me know when you’ve read this, as I’m going to remove the comments options on the home page soon. By all means carry on chatting on a more appropriate post.
      Cheers
      Deano

      Reply
  2. Hilary

    Hi Deano
    Apologies for posting on the wrong page! – I’m just getting into forums etc. steep learning curve Have read your reply ta!
    regards
    Hilary

    Reply
    1. Deano Martin Post author

      You’re not wrong Hilary. I should try and turn the comments off on the home page. Apparently it dilutes the keyword density on a page, which reduces it’s search engine ranking. The one set for this page is PERMACULTURE, so I’ll use it occasionally to maintain the balance.

      Reply
  3. steve parker

    Hi long story. Fantastic blog and info really useful we have..been running small school here at oakwood (have been in permaculture works) for five years. aranya running a forest gargen course here soon feb hopefully. Grow plenty of stuff 10 acres inc 6 of oak hazel woods. Also about to become a landlearner. So im off to lincoln on i think its the 31st jan to visit my son…two questions are you close to lincoln and any chance i could pop by for a visit (read tutorial!). I cant find another way to contact you other than comment page…regards steve

    Reply
  4. JAKES

    Hallo Deano,
    Came across your blog yesterday. Thank you for all the effort and information you’ve put into your articles. Started our own journey back to the land some 12 years ago, and it’s been like re-inventing the wheel many times over as so much ‘old time’ knowledge has been lost – not that it’s always good, but it was more sustainable I think.
    Regards Jakes

    Reply
    1. Deano Martin Post author

      Thanks Jakes
      It gives me something productive to do in my spare time. I think that it’s important to look at how things were done before industrial style farming took over, and then use that to create something that fits us now. I find that using a permaculture design process to help put the pieces together really useful.
      All of the best
      Deano

      Reply
    1. Deano Martin Post author

      Hi Andrea
      Thanks for your comment. I hope that you find plenty of useful stuff, and if you have any questions, just add a comment. I answer all comments.
      Deano

      Reply
  5. Dirty Hands

    Deano,
    Great site, came across it this morning and been enjoying reading your posts. We’re hoping to start up a similar smallholding ourselves. Reading through your detailed posts is great as your a few years on but have the same goals.

    Lots of questions but i’ll post them with the relevant Site post.

    Just wanted to thank you for taking the time to share your design methods, book reviews and updates on your projects.

    Reply
    1. Deano Martin Post author

      No worries
      I reply to all comments, so perhaps you could add your first name so that I can use it. It’s more personal.
      Good Luck with your project, and please ask if you have anything that I can help you with. Your Farm buildings look amazing on your site by the way.
      All of the best
      Deano

      Reply
    1. Deano Martin Post author

      Hi Helen
      I’ve stopped doing individual tours, as it takes up awhole day of my time. I will be organising a couple of visit days in July, which I’ll be advertising here on the blog. Hopefully I’ll see you then.
      All of the best
      Deano

      Reply
  6. Simon Benjamin

    Hello Deano,
    My partner and I have just bought a 1.5 acre smallholding in Lincolnshire, and are trying to farm in in a permacultural way. Just wanted to say Hi, we are just getting green manure growing and building up the soil at the moment, and will be planting a hedgerow next month. Its all very exciting 🙂
    Simon

    Reply
    1. Deano Martin Post author

      Sorry I don’t. Mine came from the Seed Ambassadors, and you might be able to find it through them.

      Reply
  7. Adam

    Here’s a new post I’ve made on my website, Needfire.info:

    http://www.needfire.info/home/research-into-perennial-cover-crops

    In it I’ve compiled what I’ve learned up until now on the subject of perennial cover crops. I feel that it’s a subject that merits further investigation if we’re to have a chance of stopping agriculture from destroying our soils, and imagine that this is something that might interest you.

    This requires research, i.e. people trying it out on test plots, so if you have ideas about how you’d go about this, please let me know; you can either comment on the website below the post or email me.

    Regards,

    Adam

    Reply
  8. Ian Simons

    Hi Hilary
    Have been following yr proceedings from distant sub-tropical Oz.
    Been sleeping in the chook area for a while and concentrating on perennials for sheep.
    However, I am surprized u waste yr time with bamboos. They seed randomly and rarely. Or, am I missing sumthing?
    Best wishes, Ian

    Reply
    1. Deano Martin Post author

      Hi ian
      I use the bamboo as cover for the chickens. The leavescreate a good soil mulch which is a great environment for insects which become chicken feed. The bamboo shoots are for human food.

      Reply
  9. Vicki Mottram

    Hi. Just wondering if there’s any opportunity to come and look around in the next few months? We’re trying to set up a forest garden and yours sounds a similar sort of size – it would be nice to see the real thing!
    Cheers
    Vicki

    Reply

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